How to Build a Tabletop Terrarium

How to Build a Tabletop Terrarium

Whenever Spring comes around, I automatically want to fill the house with green plants. They make a space feel alive and as I mentioned when I put together my kitchen window plant (which is still going strong), I love the idea of bringing the outdoors inside. I have a tray on top of my coffee table where I put the remotes and photo/coffee table books so they’re tidy, and usually have a candle sitting on top. I decided to build a happy little tabletop terrarium (Bob Ross fan here) to take the place of the candle, but knew it had to be small because of where I was putting it. I have been seeing a lot of terrariums lately, and there are so many possibilities with how you set this up that you can really customize to fit your taste. Here’s the few easy steps it takes to build a tabletop terrarium no matter what jar you decide on.

First, you’ll need a container. I found my container at Home Goods which actually had a tag as being from their terrarium line, but you can really use any kind of clear glass container to house your little garden. I picked up my jar just yesterday which motivated me to get started ASAP, and here’s everything I used for my DIY tabletop terrarium.

How to Build a Tabletop Terrarium Supplies

I was worried I would make a mess because of the soil, so I went outside to put together the terrarium. I started by putting a layer of rocks or pebbles at the bottom of the jar to help with drainage, which I found at Lowe’s. You could probably use fish tank rocks if you prefer too. I thought the pebbles were pretty, so I put a little more than what was probably needed, filling about an inch or two in my jar. I specifically went a little pebble happy because I didn’t want them to get lost when I added everything else, which they almost did. If you’re like me and want to see the pebbles more in your bottom layer for aesthetic appeal and not just function, I recommend going a little heavier.

How to Build a Tabletop Terrarium 3

Next, you’ll want to add a layer of activated charcoal. This helps filter the air and keep it fresh in a closed environment, since I planned on closing the lid to my terrarium when finished. I just did a light layer to where you couldn’t see the pebbles anymore, about a 1/2 inch or so. I surprisingly couldn’t find this at Lowe’s, but the nice cashier recommended I try a pet store since activated charcoal is often used for fish filters. She was correct! I found it at Petsmart for about $6.

After the charcoal, I added a very thin layer of moss. I just wanted a little bit to prevent the soil from falling into any cracks below. Next, you’ll add your soil and put in plants as desired.

How to Build a Tabletop Terrarium 4I used a variety of succulents, including a cactus, so that I would have different heights and textures. I think ferns would have been pretty too, but succulents are supposedly very hard to kill and do no require a lot of attention or watering. In fact, they can die by over-watering them because they are desert plants and like dry, hot places. I purchased a water bottle which I’ll use to lightly spray my garden every few weeks. They also like sunlight, so put them in a spot where they can see the sun….I’m hoping my coffee table is sunny enough.

How to Build a Tabletop Terrarium 5I actually wanted to go lighter on the soil layer so everything sat a little lower, but I wasn’t able to because of the size of the root base the plants had. Maybe that’s something you’ll want to consider when selecting your plants, container, and determining the thickness of your layers..

I found a few bigger rocks outside in my yard (free!) and placed them on top for decoration, along with a little more moss.

Finally, add the top and you’re done!

How to Build a Tabletop Terrarium 6

How to DIY a Terrarium

How to DIY a Terrarium 2So here’s my final mini garden.

Do you like the idea of bringing the outdoors inside? How are you embracing Spring?


How to Organize Nail Polish

style trials how to organize nail polish shoe box container store

I missed the Spring Cleaning train, but recently had an itch to organize everything. This was especially true for my under-the-sink cabinet, which was being consumed by millions of nail polishes. I had them in a box which looked like this below….not pretty. If you’re like me and have way too many colors, it can be tricky to figure out how to organize nail polish, maximize space, and clearly see all of the colors you own.

How to organize nail polish style trials beauty blogger

I’ve heard of a ton of different ways to organize nail polish, but I found that a lot of those solutions wouldn’t work for me. First off, let’s just state the obvious. I own waaaay too many colors and tend to hoard them. Not to mention the nail art tools and accessories that wouldn’t fit in those solutions. Second, I also wanted them tucked away someplace where they couldn’t be seen but could easily be transported if needed. So a wall shelf or anything like that would not work for me.

The Container Store opened near me recently, so I figured if I was going to find a solution then it would be there. However, I found that the traditional acrylic beauty bins they had were made to hold individual nail polishes, meaning you could only fit a handful of polishes and they had to be a specific size.  They also didn’t stack on top of themselves and were pricey. I asked the salesclerk if they had another recommendation, and they offered small acrylic boxes which were just too small and I didn’t think was easy enough to get to. I browsed for about an hour (you’re welcome 🙂 ) and realized exactly what I needed. Something I could use in an unconventional way which just happened to be exactly the right height, stackable, portable, clear, and easy to access a ton of different polishes…….clear shoe drawers! They were only $8.99 a drawer and I bought two, although I may go back and get another!

Each clear shoe drawer from The Container Store holds about 45-55 nail polishes, depending on the sizes of the bottles. I also love that they are drawers and not just boxes, so I can easily get to everything. My under-the-counter sink went from this to this, and I have so much more room!

style trials under the sink organization the container store I really think this is a great way to organize nail polish, especially if you have a checklist like me.

Is it kind of weird that I get a kick out of cleaning and organizing since becoming a homeowner? Haha, my Hubby thinks so but also loves it at the same time!

How do you organize nail polish? I’m sure you have a ton of other great ideas, so please share them in a comment!


How to Make a Brooch Bouquet

Recently, I stood by their side as one of my besties and one of my husband’s besties tied the knot. There’s nothing sweeter than having two of your best friends get married to each other! The bride had a vision of a rustic wedding themed with burlap, gold, lace and TOMS, and asked me to make her brooch bouquet. It went perfect with her theme, and would be a keepsake from the wedding – plus something the bride could pass down to other brides she loved, or maybe a future daughter! Of course I was honored to help her and wanted to share how I made this easy DIY bridal brooch bouquet!

how to make a brooch bouquetHere’s the main materials you need:

  • 1 bushel of faux hydrangeas (this can be found really inexpensive at your local craft store)
  • Approximately 40-60 brooches/pieces of jewelry/faux or real flowers to add-in (i.e. burlap flowers like this one). The more you put, the less of the faux hydrangea you will see. I used about 40 pieces.
  • 22-gauge florist wire (I used about 2 rolls and chose silver because it would blend in when looping through my brooches)
  • Green Corsage Tape (I used 1 1/2 rolls)
  • Scissors/Wire Cutters
  • Whatever you want to wrap around the handle – In this case, burlap, twine, and lace ribbon
  • Pearlized Ball Head Straight Pins
  • Hot glue gun

DIY Brooch Bouquet tutorial

The brooches are really the expensive part of the bouquet, but you can typically find sparkly items like jewelry on clearance to help fill in the space. And if you want to take a sentimental approach, I really loved how my friend Katie collected her brooches and would recommend it to anyone.

Katie asked the special women in her life to bring one brooch to her bridal shower to add to the bouquet, that way she would have a memory of each person as she walked down the aisle.

brooches at a bridal shower style trials

She received brooches with history such as her Grandmother’s brooch, and others that people thought reminded them of her or vice-versa. She put a piece of tape with that person’s name under each brooch so she would always remember who gave her what. Katie’s bouquet ended up being an eclectic mix of jewels, which I think turned out beautiful – I personally love mixing metals. However, if you’re wanting to stick to one color or metal, you could plan that out to best fit your style and theme.

Step 1: Creating Stems for Each Brooch

You’ll need to cut the wire into 24″ long pieces, which you’ll loop in half through the brooch (giving you about a 12″ stem). For each brooch, I used at least 2 wires, then you twist them all together. Don’t worry if the stems end up being slightly different lengths after this is done, you’ll fix that later.

How to make a brooch bouquet for a wedding

Next, you’ll wrap the green corsage tape around the metal stem, which helps hold all of the pieces together and camouflages the wire. It’s a little tricky to work with, but I found that the tighter I wound it while making sure to overlap the tape, the better it stuck. I kept it on the spool and simply twisted the stem around to quickly get this done.

DIY Brooch Bouquet tutorial 1

Step 2: Making the Stems a Bouquet

This next part was actually not as easy as I had imagined. You’ll now want to take the hydrangea to use as your base, then place each stem strategically  in the hydrangea making sure to keep it’s round shape. You’ll want to be extra careful as to where you place the brooches, because once they’re in the bushel it’s hard to rearrange because the wires may get tangled….especially towards the end when you have already placed a bunch of wire stems.

DIY Brooch Bouquet tutorial 2

It’s up to you whether you want to show any part of the hydrangea, because if you have enough brooches you can literally cover the entire thing. You’ll see we added burlap flowers to the bouquet as well to tie into Katie’s theme, so you really can customize it. It’s also up to you whether you want to remove the green leaves from the faux hydrangea all together, but I left a few to tie into our green bridesmaid dresses.

Next, cut the stems at the bottom to your desired length, which also makes sure the bouquet is one length.

Step 3: Wrapping the handle

This next part was pretty easy, and I just followed what a real florist typically does to wrap the handle. Here you can take ribbon, or burlap from a spool as I did here, and tightly wind it around the handle.

DIY Brooch Bouquet tutorial 3 burlap

With a brooch bouquet, it looks best if you wrap the entire handle rather than leaving exposed “stems” since they are really a bunch of wires. You could use a hot glue gun to hold together, but I used decorative push pins to lock everything into place. That way I could easily adjust things if needed, it added an extra design touch, and again this mimicked what florists do with real bouquets.

Step 4: Finishing Touches

I wanted to add a little something to finish the top of the handle, and the bride also had a personal touch to add as well. For the top handle part, I took a piece of lace ribbon, sewed across the top to create a stitch line, then cut a stitch at the end to pull. When the thread was “pulled,” it created a natural ruffle to the ribbon. This step isn’t necessary though, and I think the results would have looked just as good if I didn’t “ruffle” the ribbon. I just pay way too much attention to detail!

DIY Brooch Bouquet tutorial 4 lace

Next, I personalized the handle by taking a spool of twine, winding the twine around itself and hot-gluing into place. I glued a “W” charm on top of the twine background because this would be the bride’s new last initial.

Brooch Bouquet with family member picturesThe bride added these adorable picture charms to the handle, and printed pictures of family members who were no longer with us as a type of memorial. These were simply pinned in place as well. Doesn’t she and the bouquet look gorgeous?!

Bride with Brooch Bouquet

What do you think of the results? Will you be making a brooch bouquet?

Please let me know what you think of this tutorial in the blog comments! 🙂


Tips for Taking the Best License Photo, School Photo, or Passport Photo

I had planned on doing this post back when I got married and found I had to take another passport and license photo. I completely forgot about it until my recently married friend mentioned that she too just got her new license, and sans makeup or brushed hair found herself frantically taking her photo. She laughed about making the lady take her picture multiple times, but I can definitely relate as I did that too! Hey, it’s something you’ll have to live with for awhile, so why not treat it as a photoshoot? Here are a few quick tips on how to take the best license photo, school photo, or passport photo….or at least avoid looking like this.

Worst License Photo

Photo Source: mnbikingvikings.blogspot.com

Cstophecklist DONT’S for the Best License Photo, School Photo, or Passport Photo:

  1. Don’t wear crazy large patterns or stripes. They don’t tend to photograph well.
  2. Don’t wear something too trendy, meaning clothes, makeup, and hairstyle. You can have a passport for up to 10 years, and as we learned from the past, you may get sick of crimped hair and blue eyeshadow!
  3. Don’t wear anything too low cut or too high neck. Sometimes the photos are really close up and if you’re wearing something with a high neck (let’s just stay away from turtlenecks in general, k?), you’ll look like you literally have no neck. You also don’t want the “ladies” popping out….unless that’s your plan on getting out of a traffic ticket! Ha!
  4. Don’t wear statement jewelry. Sure, that ginormous chunky rhinestone necklace may be “adorbs,” but when thinking about these photos classy and understated is best. Simple stud earrings are usually my choice.
  5. Don’t wear something without sleeves. Trust me, even the tiniest of girls may not photograph as well if wearing spaghetti straps, sleeveless, and definitely not a tube top (you’ll look naked!). This mainly goes back to how the photo is cropped, so it’s more flattering if you have sleeves…even short sleeves.
Style Trials how to take a good license photo

Example of my license photo following the tips below!

checkmarkChecklist DO’S for the Best License Photo, School Photo, or Passport Photo:

  1.  Do think about what kind of top you’re wearing. Some photos you won’t see it, others you will (I’ve had license photos where you can and can’t see it, and my passport and school photos you can see it). I usually go with a solid color, either bright but not neon bright (think cherry red) or neutral. I think a color like navy or cherry red makes the picture less boring, but you can’t go wrong with neutral.
  2. Do put on makeup. And when you put it on, make sure you actually put more makeup on than you normally would in real life. From my days of professional dance teams and modeling, I learned that eyeliner, lots of mascara (or false eyelashes if you’re going to the extreme with stage makeup – not necessary for this), more blush than you normally would, and some kind of color on your lips is best. The lighting on these pics will not be great, and this will prevent you from looking washed out.
  3. Do wear your hair like you normally would. Don’t do some crazy style or go to the extra effort for beauty pageant hair, you still want to look like your everyday self. Remember, people will be looking at your i.d. to identify YOU. I usually just wear mine straight and down and pull it in front on both sides. If you pull it back or wear it up, you may end up looking like you have no hair.
  4. Do ask to retake the picture if you see it and really just can’t live with it. Of course do this at your digression as it may not make sense if you have a line behind you, but I purposely get these pictures done at times that I know it will not be as busy. It’s not a weird request, just don’t ask them to do it more than 2 or 3 times max.
  5. Do SMILE! Now is not the time to throw the camera your best pouty face. Keep your eyes open and bright, and smile big. 🙂

Do you have any other Do’s or Dont’s to add to this list, or a funny experience you had when taking one of these photos? Let me know in a comment below!


Bench Makeover & How to Calculate Fabric Yardage

My friend just moved into her new home, and is having a lot of fun making it her own. She luckily received some hand-me-down furniture (we all know how expensive it can be to furnish a new space), and wanted help revamping this bench for her guestroom! It had a really sturdy base, but the upholstered top was dirty and outdated. This fix took LESS THAN 1 HOUR – including going to the store and buying fabric! Here’s how we did it, including how to calculate fabric yardage. 

Style Trials Bench makeover no-sew hgtv chevron fabric - How to Recover an Upholstered Bench

We proceeded to Jo-Ann Fabrics (which is 2 minutes from my house), and immediately started looking at their upholstery designer fabrics. I like to pair larger organic prints such as paisley or florals with hardlines such as stripes or a mini print. We fell in love with this grey HGTV chevron fabric which is part of the HGTV designer fabric collection. It offset her paisley bedspread and green walls quite nice, and is a trendy print that would immediately bring this bench back to life!

Grey chevron and printed paisley fabric Style Trials

Figuring out the yardage was pretty easy, so I’m going to quickly walk you through a little math lesson. Luckily I have an interior design degree and worked with custom fabric treatments (i.e. windows coverings, pillows, etc), but I know this can be the hardest part and potentially a costly mistake. Using these tips on how to calculate fabric yardage will hopefully help!

How to Calculate Fabric Yardage

First, we measured the area being recovered. This bench was only 45″ wide and the fabric bolt was 55″ wide, so we didn’t have to worry about seams or railroading (turning the bolt sideways) the fabric. 55 inches minus 45 inches = 10″ total of allowance (or 5″ per side) to wrap around the back of the bench and staple – perfect! Next I had to figure out the depth so I could determine how much fabric I needed cut from the bolt.

The bench was about 16″ deep, and I wanted to allow an extra 4″-5″ on either side for staple-gun allowance. 16 inches + 5 inches (allowance top) + 5 inches (allowance bottom) = 26″ total. That’s what I based my overall yardage on, since the 55″ width of the bolted fabric is a standard that stays the same as they simply unroll the bolt for how much fabric you need.

From here, you take the amount in inches (in this case 26″), and ALWAYS divide by 36 to convert inches into yardage of fabric needed. That gave me 0.72 yards of fabric needed. I typically round up to the nearest 1/4 yard because it doesn’t hurt to get just a little extra fabric in case your calculations are off. You can judge this yourself based on how much seam allowance you included and how far off from the next 1/4 yard you are. We ordered 0.75 or 3/4 of a yard.

How to Recover an Upholstered Bench No-Sew Technique

  1. We started by unscrewing the top of the upholstered bench from the base using a drill.
  2. We decided the new chevron fabric was thick enough that we could simply recover the bench over the existing fabric, that way we didn’t damage the padding or loose it’s shape. If you can do this, it makes the entire process SO much easier.
  3. We laid the face of the chevron fabric down so it was facing the ground. Then we put the board on top, front side down. Because this is a geometric print with a repeat, I wanted to measure to make sure it was evenly spaced out on the fabric. I measured the center of the board (where the purple pen is shown below) and lined it up with the center of a chevron point like this. I also eyeballed where I wanted it to hit on the sides. style trials Measuring fabric to recover seat - How to Calculate Fabric YardageIf you’re not sure, you can always wrap the fabric around the board with your hands and look at it real quick to make sure you like how it’s placed. It’s always better to double check!
  4. Next, we proceeded with stapling the fabric around all 4 sides before proceeding to the corners. Make sure to read my tutorial from when I recovered my kitchen chairs on exactly how to do this, and how to fold the corners which can be the trickiest part.Staple nosew recover fabric tutorial diy - How to Calculate Fabric Yardage
  5. From there, simply drill the seat back on the benchtop and you’re done!

Before & After Pics:

Before and After Bench Seat Recovered - How to Recover an Upholstered BenchStyle Trials Bench Recover Before And After - How to Recover an Upholstered Bench

Style Trials Bench Makeover After Grey Chevron Print

Not too shabby for less than an hours worth of work, huh? She plans to eventually stain the piece darker and add new hardware, but at least now it looks fresh and part of this century! 🙂

What do you think of the finished piece and have you tried doing anything like this before? If so, let me know below…I’d love to see your before and after pictures!

 


How to do a High Top Knot Bun like Nicole Richie

Bun hairstyles are still going strong. And what’s not to love? They can save you from rainy days, bad beach hair, or simply when you just don’t feel like styling washing your hair. From my tutorial on how to do a messy bun or a sleek doughnut  bun, you saw that there’s different types of buns that range from glam to boho chic. This tutorial is focusing on the high, top knot bun that Nicole Richie is famous for. Plus, it’s SUPER easy and takes less than 2 minutes to do!

Style Trials Nicole Richie top knot bun with bangs

Photo Credit: whowhatwhere.com

Style Trials Nicole Richie High Top Knot Bun Hairstyle

Photo Credit: youreatulle.blogspot.com

You’ll see a top knot is supposed to be a tighter styled bun, taller, and right on top of your head. Doesn’t Nicole Richie’s top knot look adorable? Kinda makes me want bangs.

Because it’s a simple hairstyle, it really lets smokey eyes, a bright lip, or a killer outfit take the stage. For me, I also found that this is the easiest and quickest bun if you have fine or thin hair. It actually looks best because with a top knot, you want the base of the bun to be as small as possible, which pushes up height on the bun. Checkout my 2 minute tutorial below:

How to do a High Top Knot Bun like Nicole Richie

 You don’t technically HAVE to have bobby pins, so if you need a quick fix and only have a hair-tie, this would still work.

Style Trials high top knot bun hair tutorial

Have you tried a top knot or any of these other kinds of bun hairstyles? Leave me a comment!


How to Write A Wedding Speech

When I was asked to be my big sister’s Matron of Honor (Maid of Honor), I was ecstatic! Of course, yes! However, I had a looming twinge of “OMG, I have to write a speech” lurking within. The thought of summarizing what Danielle meant to me seemed impossible, plus she wrote a beautiful speech for my wedding. I wanted to do a good job for her.

I tried searching a few things on the internet for ideas/tips, and didn’t really come up with too much. So I sat down and thought about it more, then came up with a “Ultimate Wedding Speech Formula” that I think really helped. I wanted to share these 10 wedding speech tips in case it helps a fellow MOH, plus list out my speech so I’ll have it stored to remember.

  1. MOH Wedding Speech TipsKeep it around 3-5 minutes. People tend to get distracted after that.
  2. For me, it was easiest to write the middle of the speech first, then add the intro and conclusion after.
  3. Beginning – Introduce yourself. How are you related to the Bride?
  4. Personalize it – Tell at least one detailed funny or heartwarming story that is personalized about the Bride, such as what it was like growing up with her. Make sure it’s not all inside jokes that nobody in the audience will understand!
  5. What about the Bride makes you love her? What are some of her personality traits? How has she helped you, and what does she mean to you?
  6. Don’t forget the groom! How long have you known him? How did things change after the Bride met her future husband? Tell a personalized story about the groom or details about why they’re perfect together.
  7. Add something interactive if it makes sense. Include a relevant prop, or ask the audience or Bride & Groom to do something. This makes things more memorable and engaging.
  8. Look towards the future – Now that they’re married, what do you wish for the happy couple? End with a toast, quote, or piece of advice for the couple.
  9. Don’t forget to end the speech with raising your glass and asking everyone to toast to the Newlyweds!
  10. Practice! I practiced wearing heels (I know it sounds silly, but helped!), practiced in the mirror, practiced in front of my friends and hubby, and of course didn’t forget the hairbrush microphone. 🙂

I didn’t want to blank out, so I brought up a piece of paper with the speech written on it. Note cards wouldn’t really work because you’ll be holding a microphone and maybe drink, so I made sure my speech was condensed to one sheet of paper. Because I practiced, I didn’t really need to look at it that much. I tried to remember key points, and tell the stories in my own voice rather than reading word-for-word, so they were more authentic. Here I am giving my speech:

Maid of Honor giving wedding speechObviously I’m looking out at the guests in this shot, but another important step is to really look at everybody you’re addressing. Pay attention to your body language, and make sure to look at the Bride and Groom.

So here it is, the speech I gave at my sister’s wedding:

Hi Everyone, my name is Kristen. Many of you know that I’m Danielle’s sister and the middle of the three Barnhart daughters. I’m thrilled to be Danielle’s Matron of Honor on this special day. Many of you know Danielle as a friend, family member, or co-worker, so I wanted to let you in on what it was like actually growing up with Danielle from my perspective.

Growing up, I was an awkward little girl with glasses and braces. You know, the “creative” type. Luckily, I had an older, beautiful and talented sister to look up to. Danielle was smart, popular, and gifted in piano, tennis, and dance. Although I’m sure there were times where the 5 year age gap deemed me her “annoying little sister,” she was always looking out for Lauren and I. I eagerly accepted her hand-me down clothes even if they had holes or stains, and loved when she took the lead at teaching us stuff such as how to do a cartwheel, or putting on a fashion show starring us and all the neighborhood kids.

As we got older, I probably drove her a little crazy with stealing her clothes. I remember this one time specifically when I stole her new shirt to wear to school. She went to school earlier than me, so getting it on was pretty easy. But because I came home after her, I had to bring one of my shirt’s to throw on over hers before I got home so she wouldn’t notice. I thought it was genius, but somehow she figured it out and a big fight broke out. Okay, I know I was in the wrong, but because of Danielle’s generous nature, she only locked her closet for ONE day after that. Again, always watching out for her sisters.

Looking back now, it’s apparent that she really paved the way for Lauren and I because she was so successful in her milestones and wanted us to be as well. We followed in her footsteps with piano, tennis, dance, and becoming sorority sisters. I even went to the same college as her, and she opened our eyes to the world of designer fashions. GOOD LUCK, Chris. 🙂

I’m sure many here know that Danielle’s been a great role model to not only us, but many others ranging from the “cool babysitter” to the caring dance coach. After Danielle’s years on the Orlando Magic dance team, she actually coached a professional dance team I was on. It was there that she later introduced me to my husband, Gary, who also worked for the team. My future would not have been the same without the help of Danielle.

Over the years, our relationship has grown to more than just sisters. I turn to her as my mentor, the one I can lean on for advice and support, or simply if I’m looking for a shopping buddy. We understand each other, and truly are best friends. Danielle, I am SO incredibly lucky to have a sister like you. Thank you for always listening, being a great example, and just being there.

I didn’t know Chris until they started dating, but I’ve come to find that he is the perfect match for my sister. Chris and Danielle both have that kind, thoughtful, generous nature about them, and are very family-oriented. And come on, he can play the piano better than us! Chris’ methodical thinking balances out Danielle’s impulsiveness, bringing out the best in each other. It’s incredible to see a girl from the midwest find her sole-mate from Virginia in Florida, and their wedding story proves of fate as well. She always had a crush on Chris in college, and says she wouldn’t have passed her business class without his help. Years later after graduation and random occasions of bumping into each other, the stars aligned and they finally had the opportunity to try things out. Obviously it worked, and although he’s been a part of the family for awhile, I’m happy to officially call him my brother!

Danielle and Chris, please hold each other’s hand. [hold hands]. I’m so excited to see what this next chapter in life brings you, and I’ll leave you with this one piece of wisdom. One of the best things in the world is when someone you love holds your hand. I wish you a lifetime of happiness, love, and hand holding through thickness and thin. Congratulations, I love you both. Let’s raise our glasses to the bride and groom!


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